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Contemporary Print Handbook

Editor(s) Cara Benedeto
Contributor(s) Thom Donovan, Corinn Gerber, Suzanne Herrera, Maddy Varner, Transformazium, Erik Wyzocan

The Contemporary Print Handbook is a textbook for studio printmaking, with a focus on lithography. The book renovates print terminology, both new and old methods of technique, theory, and modes of dissemination, as well as the economy of the multiple within feminist terms that engage abundance, plurality, and care. Contributors include Transformazium, Maddy Varner, Suzanne Herrera, Thom Donovan, Corinn Gerber, and Erik Wyzocan, edited by Cara Benedetto, published with Halmos.

The Machine Stops

Author(s) E. M. Forster
Contributor(s) Julieta Aranda, Fia Backström, R. Lyon, Ed Atkins, Ian Cheng, Melanie Gilligan, Tobias Madison, Pedro Neves Marques, Jeff Nagy, Rachel Rose, Bea Schlingelhoff, Mariana Silva
Editor(s) Erik Wysocan

“You who listen to me are in a better position to judge about the French Revolution than I am. Your descendants will be even in a better position than you, for they will learn what you think I think, and yet another intermediate will be added to the chain. And in time…there will come a generation…which will see the French Revolution not as it happened, nor as they would like it to have happened, but as it would have happened, had it taken place in the days of the Machine.”

E.M. Forster wrote his one work of dystopian science fiction, The Machine Stops, in 1909 – two years before the invention of television – and yet the text echoes our own over-networking-induced autophobia.  Informed by the physical isolation imposed by the Edwardian England’s homosexual oppression, Forster describes the world in the aftermath of an unnamed ecological crisis, living divided underground, without physical contact and without history – a captive life held within in the habitual routine that is an endless electronic circulation of opinions and subjectivities. It is an early 20th century foretelling of our own unfolding age. Working from this ominously familiar future, twelve artists – Julieta Aranda, Fia Backström & R. Lyon, Ed Atkins, Ian Cheng, Melanie Gilligan, Tobias Madison, Pedro Neves Marques, Jeff Nagy, Rachel Rose, Bea Schlingelhoff, Mariana Silva – have contributed new texts addressing the current state of culture in the age of global networks and global crisis.

Also available for Apple iBook and Amazon Kindle.

The Machine Stops is distributed by DAP.

Wyoscan

Author(s) Dexter Sinister
Contributor(s) Erik Wysocan

Time is like that — both point AND duration. This is how it can bend and warp. A week, a second, a season: all are specific and discrete, but none are the same. The present can be cut to any number of lengths, from a single electric pulse of an electronic circuit to the display period of a digital timepiece.

Wyoscan is a reverse-engineered clock. It has been programmed to slowly render the current time from left to right, scanning across the screen, completing 1 cycle every 2 seconds (0.5 hz).

You’ll notice that reading this clock requires more attention than usual, as the seven segments of each digit are lit one by one across the display. This speed may be adjusted. Double tap the screen of your device and move your finger up or down to change the display rate until it reaches the limits of your perception. You and your clock are now in tune.

Wyoscan evolved from Watch Wyoscan 0.5 hz, a digital watch produced by Halmos and designed by Dexter Sinister. This new iOS app mines the logic of the original but leaves its hardware behind.

Available for iPhone and iPad.

Memoirs of the Twentieth Century

Author(s) Samuel Madden
Contributor(s) Liam Gillick
Editor(s) Erik Wysocan

Written in 1733, Memoirs of the Twentieth Century is widely regarded to contain the earliest known conception of time-travel and, in particular, the first cognitive leap that would allow for a historicized image of the present as seen from the point of view of a distant future. Intriguingly, it is the text itself which is claimed to have traveled back in time and Madden has used this conceit to satirize his own period – tracing out its bureaucratic absurdities into a strange yet pointed vision of the late 20th century: a world politically fraught, overwhelmed with corruption and struggling to reconcile religious faith with scientific discovery.

The mysterious publishing history of the book imparts a certain weight to its claims. Printed anonymously in an edition of 1000, all but 10 copies were immediately destroyed for unknown reasons. It would only be printed once more in 1972 and until now Memoirs… has been extremely scarce – resulting in disappointingly little scholarship. This new edition includes Liam Gillick’s Prevision. Should the Future Help the Past first published in 1999, the very year when Memoirs… leaves off. Gillick explores the socio-political implications inherent in strategic attitudes towards the future with a critical eye to the ‘scenario planning’ of late capitalism. It provides a prescient framework for reconsidering Madden’s text now, just over ten years on since its fictive origination and apocalyptic conclusion.

To encourage further study, the complete text will be freely distributed electronically in conjunction with the limited edition hard-cover and a mass-market paperback. ∎

The Familiar Stranger

Author(s) Tauba Auerbach

Modified Casio watch produced in an edition of 200 – each able to display its unique edition number. Instruction manual with original text by Tauba Auerbach included.

I think about time — all the time.
I think about its elasticity and its asymmetry. I’ve always had a fraught relationship with this “familiar stranger” as J.T. Fraser aptly called it…

The Familiar Stranger is a study in chronobiology – a field of research that first emerged from the subterranean world of cave explorers in the 60s and 70s. Deep underground, devoid of external cues, the biological experiences of time proved to be elastic and subjective. Auerbach’s watch is designed to reproduce “cave time” with the display of a spinning cycle adjustable to match the wearer’s own biological rhythm.

 

Watch Wyoscan 0.5 Hz

Author(s) Dexter Sinister
Algorithm Erik Wysocan

Time is like that — both point AND duration. This is how it can bend and warp. A week, a second, a season: all are specific and discrete, but none are the same. The present can be cut to any number of lengths, from a single vibration of a quartz crystal to the display period of a digital timepiece.

Watch Wyoscan 0.5 Hz is a reverse-engineered Casio digital watch. A tiny computer inside has been reprogrammed to slowly render the current time from left to right, scanning across its liquid crystal face, completing 1 cycle every 2 seconds.

You’ll notice that reading this watch requires more attention than usual, as the seven segments of each digit are lit one by one across its display. This speed may be adjusted until it reaches the limits of your perception. You and your watch are now in tune.

Watch Wyoscan was adjusted by Dexter Sinister » and produced by Halmos with support from Objectif Exhibitions », Antwerp, and Yale Union », Portland. It is available *now* (usd $175) in select retail shops. ∎

Fainnie Azul Horologe

Author(s) Marc von Schlegell

Edition of 30 +5

Download the Operation Manual

Space Age Plastique Temperature Sensitive Crystal Revolutionary / Gregorian Time Speed of Earth Mode

If a true chronometer tells you what time it is not, until now, citizen, an honest watch was a lie.

The French Revolution and American slavery emancipation entangle in an alternate world in which the trajectory of history is mutable and egalité takes on extra-dimensional implications. So goes the chronautic undertakings of Fannie Azul, the protagonist in the eponymous work by author Mark von Schlegell. Out of this universe comes The Fainnie Azul Horologe – a new publication in the form of a digital watch: a ficto-chronographer that at once keeps the calendrier révolutionnaire according to the principles of decimal time as well as our own archaic Gregorian form. The timekeeper features a cosmological odometer, indexing in km/second as the Earth speeds through the cosmic background radiation: the one universal reference in a space-time defined by relativity. The Fainnie Azul Horologe was conceived by Mark von Schlegell with algorithm development by Erik Wysocan.

 

Art writer and science fiction novelist Mark von Schlegell is the author of Venusia (2005), Mercury Station (2009) and the forthcoming Sundogz, from Semiotext(e). He teaches the Pure Fiction Seminar at Staedelschule, Frankfurt, Germany. His criticism and fiction appear regularly the world over. He has scripted numerous Artist Films including Ben Rivers’ Slow Action (2010) and Frances Scholz’s Episodes of Starlite (2011). His story “Fainnie Azul,” inspiration for the Fainnie Azul Horologe, will be published as one of Semiotext(e)’s 2014 Whitney Biennial pamphlets.

Société Populaire

Author(s) D.A.F. de Sade
Contributor(s) Paul Chan, Claire Fontaine, Gareth James, Sam Lewitt, Pratchaya Phinthong, Pamela Rosenkranz, John Russell, Antek Walczak
Translator(s) Robin Mackay
Editor(s) Erik Wysocan

“Weep no more, citizens; they breathe, these celebrated men for whom we cry; our patriotism reanimates them”

Presented in honor of Marat and Le Pelletier, “Citizen Sade” wrote this memorial address at the height of violence during the French Revolution, just after the start of the Reign of Terror. The text, effusive and cloyingly patriotic, brings to question the Sade’s own political position – a provocative impulse all the more remarkable given the addresses audience: the gathered Section des Piques, amongst the most hardline Jacobin districts of Paris. Though frequently cited and made infamous as the inspiration for Peter Weiss’ influential work of avant-garde theater Marat/Sade, the text itself has remained obscure outside of France.

Available in English for the first time, this new translation by Robin Mackay serves as the historical foundation for a collection of artist’s writings. Included are Paul Chan, Claire Fontaine, Gareth James, Sam Lewitt, Pratchaya Phinthong, Pamela Rosenkranz, John Russell, and Antek Walczak.